ぜんぶ君のせいだ。 (Zenbukiminoseida.) – FlashBack NightMare

ぜんぶ君のせいだ。 (ZenbuKimiNoSeiDa.)

The brand new album of ぜんぶ君のせいだ。 (Zenbukiminoseida.), titled FlashBack NightMare, drops alongside new music videos.

The first track, “Scar Sign”, opens with a fun, chugging metalcore style riff before kicking up the ぜんぶ君のせいだ。 (Zenbukiminoseida.). have been putting in quite a lot of work this year, with group and solo singles and three (two being re-recordings) albums, and a massive tour, all within the span of this year alone. For today, we’ll be taking a look at their latest album, FlashBack NightMare, which dropped on November 24th. Unlike the previous releases, FlashBack contains completely new tracks.

BPM in the verses, the drums really helping set a precedent of just how heavy the song can get. Compared to the chaotic nature of the verses, the choruses take up a lighter sound and vocal style. Vocals used vary between singing, spoken word and a couple lines of screaming. The last minute of the song really hones in on the yami nature of Zenkimi’s concept, with the members reciting their lines with an almost spine-tingling harmony, something the music video helps in visualizing with their eyes going fully black alongside the blood red lighting.

The second track, “Heavenlyheaven”, was featured in a review I did a while back when it was released as a single; it does a fantastic job in showing how Zenkimi can balance whimsy and hardcore. “Underscore” is the third track (and the third music video to be released from this album), opening with a mathcore-esque guitar and bass riff. In the first 25 seconds alone the song takes some wild twists and turns between singing, screaming and the fun instrumentals, giving some Dillinger Escape Plan levels of chaos. Through the second verse the girls take turns swapping between lines (which sounds super cool in headphones as they go from left to right). Twinkling piano keys, handclaps and digital blips once again showcase the unpredictable nature of Zenkimi songs: there’s really never a dull moment. Each member gets her own chance to shine throughout this song too, their vocals coming off as clear as day.

“Dada”, originally released as a single earlier this year, makes a comeback on this album. The track has a super fun and bouncy beat led by the style of drums (those blast beats in the pre chorus are so sick too). It feels like it’d be perfectly fit for a rhythm game. The twists within the song help reel in that concept of “Dadaism” as well. The bridge takes a fun, but not unexpected, dark turn with the introduction of Kotetsu’s shrill shrieks and Mei’s hearty screams. Definitely a headbanger. “Pistil” gives some classic heavy metal action straight out the gate. The pre chorus sections take on more of a jazzy, almost lounge singer feel that don’t come off as out of place amidst the rapid energy of the song. Vocals are as great as always, especially in the chorus; though I love to hear these girls scream, their clean singing capabilities are just as special and just as top notch. “315.3”, the seventh track, is a classic metalcore track with spoken vocal relays in the verses following a really sick, catchy riff that sounds like descending notes. The choruses really pack a punch with the girls taking turns screaming the English parts, and my goodness, the first scream in the second chorus is insanely good. Putting all of that together has it topping my list as my favorite track.

“Mono No Koi Aware” is probably the most interesting song on the album just from the genre flips alone. Throughout the entire three minute track, there’s never a dull moment and a crazy amount of switch ups, from EDM to dubstep, gothic-symphonic-metal to jazz and more. It almost feels as if the song is playing to the unique conceptual strengths of each of the members– and while the verses stand out in great moments of individuality, in the chorus they all come together perfectly. So while sonically it might be a step in a more lighthearted direction from the previous tracks, it keeps the vibes rolling perfectly.

“Monster” serves as the most somber track on the album through alt rock and the subtle usage of piano. The vocal delivery is a bit more emotional, something I’ve noticed Zenkimi is fantastic at, especially this current lineup. The chorus here makes you want to get up and shout it out with them. “Insomnia”, which was a track released last year with the inclusion of An, Fufu and Kasane, makes a comeback on this album, making it the only re-recorded track to allow for Mei and Kotetsu to partake. Because of this, the song remains relatively the same. The final track, “Rakugaki Kiseki”, brings back a lighthearted vibe to close the album out with the soft opening chords and electronica effects. It’s a slower track as well, almost bordering on a ballad track. Always a group to give it their all though, the build up through the first couple of verses leads to an amazing duo screaming from Mei and Kotetsu at the 1:40 mark declaring their love, followed up by a little rap moment. It mellows out again for the ending of the track with the girls taking turns and harmonizing as they lead us hand in hand to the end, followed by the guitar and drums fading out with them.

FlashBack NightMare has been the first fully original track from Zenkimi since 2019, and it was absolutely one worth waiting for. With this lineup only fully coming together at the beginning of the year, they’ve continuously shown their chops in all shapes and forms. I really couldn’t ask for more (though the possibility of an international tour would be amazing someday), and I’m hoping you give this album a listen. Fan or newcomer, it’s sure to reel you in all the same.


CHIKA RADAR #29: 負け犬とクズ (Makeinu To Kuzu / Losing dog Waste)

CHIKA RADAR #29: 負け犬とクズ (Makeinu To Kuzu / Losing dog Waste)

Today on Chika Radar we are going to discover 負け犬とクズ, or Losing dog Waste; a recently born group for fans of dark and metal idols.

When it comes to bizarre names, idol groups are often an interesting category to look at. I mean, who else would think that Losing dog Waste is a good name, if not a Japanese idol unit? Maybe a grindcore band, but let’s ignore that for now. In any case, the group’s original name is 負け犬とクズ (Makeinu To Kuzu) and they’re not really punk-ish, although their music is still quite heavy.

Makeinu To Kuzu was born this year and their line-up currently includes five members:

After their debut which happened last August, Makeinu To Kuzu recently released their first singles, which you can find below.

The first one is called “Illusion Requiem” and it gives symphonic metal vibes right from the beginning, featuring choir-like vocals, church organs and a neoclassical solo. Despite the dark and atmospheric elements, the song brings some heaviness with powerful guitar riffs and some growls here and there.

Lately, the group released another singles called “HANGEKI KATARUSISU”, which sounds more idol-ish (especially during the chorus) than the previous one, while also keeping the rock-metal elements; this one also seems less gothic-symphonic, except for the slightly creepy waltz-rhythmed parts.

From these first releases, we can say that Makeinu To Kuzu doesn’t sound that bad. In my opinion, “Illusion Requiem” has a better and more insteresting sound, although “HANGEKI KATARUSISU” is quite enjoyable as well. Their aesthetics seems to suggest that they may lean more towards gothic-oriented music, and I personally hope they’ll do that in the future.

CHIKA RADAR #28: MystericGirl

CHIKA RADAR #28: MystericGirl

MystericGirl hasn’t released anything yet, but from their live shows they look very promising. Let’s get to know these idols with Chika Radar.

As you should already know, Chika Radar usually intercepts unknown signals from new unidentified entities; in other words, it’s all about newborn idol units. This time, though, the group we are going to talk about has been around for more than one year; despite this, there are no MVs, singles or any kind of releases from them yet. That’s why, as always, we have to thank iColony for allowing us to see high quality live videos from these obscure idols. Anyway, it’s time to talk about MystericGirl.

First of all, they are under Cmajor Works; I’m saying this immediately because they are not even mentioned on the units section of their website, which confused me a bit when I started searching informations about them. The group’s first line-up has been unveiled in August 2020 and they gave off strongly dark-tinged vibes; while their sound is not that dark, they definitely lean towards that side of the music world and their aesthetics is gothic-like as well.

Currently, MystericGirl features five members:

  • ハルカ (Haruka), in charge of green
  • 四葉ひより (Yotsuba Hiyori), in charge of yellow
  • 有栖れあ (Arisu Rea), in charge of violet
  • 椿あやね (Tsubaki Ayane), in charge of orange
  • 藤白ねむ。 (Fujishiro Nemu), in charge of blue

MystericGirl

The group has been quite active with their live shows and, thanks to iColony, we get to see their performance at GOTANDA G2 of last August.

As we said before, they a slightly dark idol unit, but they also feature the usual idol music catchiness in their vocal lines. Their intense and emotional rock/metal sound is often enriched by symphonic elements and gothic-like vibes; the result of this combination perfectly matches their aesthetics with black and refined outfits. On a side note, I love those bass parts they have here and there.

The only thing I need from them now is a release of any kind and in any format, from a digital single to a full length CD anything goes. I’m begging you, guys at Cmajor Works: let me support them and listen to their music.

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